V2G Microgrid Systems

OUR V2G SYSTEMS

Costs & Consequences Of Downtime In An Outage

The advantages of investing in backup power solutions to protect critical systems greatly outweighs the enormous costs of downtime. Irreparable damage and irretrievable loss of lives and revenue in a matter of moments,  downtime wreaks havoc and compounds with direct, indirect, short-term, and long-term costs and consequences. 

In 2014, electrical power outages, spikes and surges were estimated to cost more than $150 billion USD in annual damages to the U.S. economy [1].

  • 200 to 700 lives lost [2]
  • $195 billion in direct and indirect economic loss. Costliest disaster in Texas history [3] [4]

According to a new analysis from the University of Houston, most Texans served by the state's main power system were affected by the terrible and deadly winter storm,  with almost 70% of those affected losing power in subfreezing conditions and nearly half experiencing water outages.

 

Those who lost electricity spent an average of 42 hours without power [5].

 

The severity of damage the storm wreaked could make it the costliest disaster in Texas history, resulting in an estimated 200 to 700 lives being lost.

  • Nearly 5,000 lives lost
  • $90.1 billion in cost to businesses [6]

Hurricane Maria tore through the island of Puerto Rico, destroying trees and bringing down weather stations and cell towers, putting its 3.4 million citizens in a critical humanitarian crisis.

 

Electricity was cut off to 100 percent of the island, and most people had limited access to clean water and food [7].

 

Hurricane Maria was responsible for the loss of 5,000 lives in Puerto Rico, according to Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The leading cause of mortality was a lack of medical care, largely caused by a continued shutdown of essential utilities. On average, homes were without power for 84 days and were without water for 68 days. It also cost businesses up to $90 billion US dollars.

 

Day-long power outages are still common, particularly in rural areas. Collapsed trees and utility poles are now a common sight. Hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans have left the island due to the ongoing difficulties [6].

  • 134 lives lost [8]
  • The 4th costliest U.S. Atlantic storm at $77.1 billion [9]

When hurricane Irma had finished, 80% of Miami-Dade County continued without power [9], and 25% of all county accounts were still without power a week later. As a result of the inadequate backup generators, a dozen lives were tragically lost at a local nursing home.

 

Days before the storm’s landfall, over 60% of gas stations in the Miami/Fort Lauderdale area were out of fuel [10], and it took weeks for fuel supplies to be refilled. 134 lives were lost as a result.

  • Largest power failure in North American history, spanning 24,086 square kilometres and affecting approximately 50 million people.
  • At least 11 lives lost [11]

More than 50 million people in the northeastern United States and Ontario Canada experienced the biggest power outage in the history of North America (August 14, 2003). Restoration continued for nine days until the state of emergency ended (August 22).

 

It was estimated that Ontario workers lost 18.9 million hours of employment, and manufacturing shipments fell $2.3 billion. The outage contributed to at least 11 deaths and an estimated $6 billion in cost.

  • 200 to 700 lives lost [2]
  • $195 billion in direct and indirect economic loss. Costliest disaster in Texas history [3] [4]

According to a new analysis from the University of Houston, most Texans served by the state's main power system were affected by the terrible and deadly winter storm,  with almost 70% of those affected losing power in subfreezing conditions and nearly half experiencing water outages.

 

Those who lost electricity spent an average of 42 hours without power [5].

 

The severity of damage the storm wreaked could make it the costliest disaster in Texas history, resulting in an estimated 200 to 700 lives being lost.

  • Nearly 5,000 lives lost
  • $90.1 billion in cost to businesses [6]

Hurricane Maria tore through the island of Puerto Rico, destroying trees and bringing down weather stations and cell towers, putting its 3.4 million citizens in a critical humanitarian crisis.

 

Electricity was cut off to 100 percent of the island, and most people had limited access to clean water and food [7].

 

Hurricane Maria was responsible for the loss of 5,000 lives in Puerto Rico, according to Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The leading cause of mortality was a lack of medical care, largely caused by a continued shutdown of essential utilities. On average, homes were without power for 84 days and were without water for 68 days. It also cost businesses up to $90 billion US dollars.

 

Day-long power outages are still common, particularly in rural areas. Collapsed trees and utility poles are now a common sight. Hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans have left the island due to the ongoing difficulties [6].

  • 134 lives lost [8]
  • The 4th costliest U.S. Atlantic storm at $77.1 billion [9]

When hurricane Irma had finished, 80% of Miami-Dade County continued without power [9], and 25% of all county accounts were still without power a week later. As a result of the inadequate backup generators, a dozen lives were tragically lost at a local nursing home.

 

Days before the storm’s landfall, over 60% of gas stations in the Miami/Fort Lauderdale area were out of fuel [10], and it took weeks for fuel supplies to be refilled. 134 lives were lost as a result.

  • Largest power failure in North American history, spanning 24,086 square kilometres and affecting approximately 50 million people.
  • At least 11 lives lost [11]

More than 50 million people in the northeastern United States and Ontario Canada experienced the biggest power outage in the history of North America (August 14, 2003). Restoration continued for nine days until the state of emergency ended (August 22).

 

It was estimated that Ontario workers lost 18.9 million hours of employment, and manufacturing shipments fell $2.3 billion. The outage contributed to at least 11 deaths and an estimated $6 billion in cost.

In Canada, extreme and rapid weather changes cause up to 32% of power outage incidents, which are difficult to predict and usually allow no time to create an emergency plan.

According to Dunn & Bradstreet, 59 percent of Fortune 500 companies have a weekly downtime of at least 1.6 hours. If a Fortune 500 company employs 10,000 people and pays them an average of $56 per hour (including benefits), the cost of downtime in labour alone would be $896,000 a week, or more than $46 million per year [1].

Tangible and intangible costs during an outage for these businesses include: [1]

References:

  1. “Blackout Tracker Canada,” Eaton Power Quality Company, February 2014
  2. “Heights lifts boil-water notice after 8 days,” The Killeen Daily Herald, February 27, 2021
  3. “Winter Storm URI After-Action Review Findings Report,” City of Austin & Travis County, 2021
  4. Garrett Golding, Anil Kumar and Karel Mertens, “Cost of Texas’ 2021 Deep Freeze Justifies Weatherization,” Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, April 15, 2021
  5. Neelam Bohra, “Almost 70% of ERCOT customers lost power during winter storm, study finds,” The Texas Tribune, March 29, 2021
  6. D. D. Kane, “Mortality in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria,” N. Engl. J. Med., vol. 379, no. 17, p. e30, 2018
  7. “The facts: Hurricane Maria’s effect on Puerto Rico,” Mercy Corps, January 19, 2018, Updated September 09, 2020
  8. Amy Gesenhues, “Hurricane Irma was the No. 1 top trending Google search in the US & globally for 2017,” Search Engine Land, December 13, 2017
  9. A. Dodson, “This Florida City Used ‘Smart Data’ To Stay Ahead Of Hurricane Michael.,” 2018
  10. M. Egan, “Gas shortage: Florida races to refill gas stations after Hurricane Irma,” CNN Business, 2017
  11. “Ontario–U.S. Power Outage—Impacts on Critical Infrastructure Number: IA06-002,” Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, August, 2006

More Community Benefits

TAKENAKA HQ

The main goals were to develop a new office style with improved office communication, to maintain a high level of both environmental quality and performance, to develop new low-cost parts, to reduce LCC, and to build an environmental performance maintenance system after construction, all of which were designed to help develop this “sustainable works.”

OSAKA BUSINESS PARK

SMART CITY / DC Building Concept

MAUI VPP NETWORK

The goal of the project was to show how smart-grid technologies with V2G (120+ units) could be utilized to enable efficient use of renewable energy on an island and respond to changing system demands caused by as-available renewable energy, such as rooftop solar power.

Our Assembly in Richmond Hill, ON

PHASE ONE

Phase 1 recruited more than 200 EV owners or lessees and 30 homeowner volunteers. 13 fast-charging stations were installed across the island, the first such installation in the state.

PHASE TWO

Phase 2 had V2G systems installed in 80 homes and businesses, creating a Virtual Power Plant (VPP) that would integrate and manage renewable energy resources, including EV batteries.

Projects

*Not all projects are contained in this list

ABOUT US

EVolve Grid is driven to provide the most innovative and efficient bidirectional V2G power management systems and DC microgrid technologies to industries and critical infrastructures around the world to meet the needs for disaster mitigation, climate resilience, and power sustainability for a greener, brighter future free of emissions.

COSTOS Y CONSECUENCIAS DEL TIEMPO DE INACTIVIDAD EN UN APAGÓN

Las ventajas de invertir en soluciones de energía de respaldo para proteger sistemas críticos superan en gran medida los enormes costos del tiempo de inactividad. Daños irreparables y pérdidas irrecuperables de vidas e ingresos en cuestión de momentos, el tiempo de inactividad causa estragos que se agrava con costos y consecuencias directas, indirectas, a corto y largo plazo.

En 2014, se estimó que los cortes de energía eléctrica, los picos y las sobrecargas costaron más de $150 mil millones de dólares en daños anuales a la economía de los EE. UU. [1].

  • 200 a 700 vidas perdidas [2]
  • $195 mil millones en pérdidas económicas directas e indirectas. El desastre más costoso en la historia de Texas [3] [4]

Según un nuevo análisis de la Universidad de Houston, la mayoría de los tejanos que reciben servicios del sistema eléctrico principal del estado se vieron afectados por la terrible y mortal tormenta invernal, con casi el 70% de los afectados perdiendo energía en condiciones de congelación y casi la mitad sufriendo cortes de agua.

 

Los que se quedaron sin electricidad pasaron en promedio 42 horas sin luz [5].

 

La gravedad de los daños causados ​​por la tormenta podría convertirlo en el desastre más costoso en la historia de Texas, resultando en la lamentable pérdida de unas 200 a 700 vidas.

  • Casi 5.000 vidas perdidas
  • 90.1 millones de dólares en costos para las empresas [6]

El huracán María arrasó la isla de Puerto Rico, destruyó árboles, derribó estaciones meteorológicas, torres de telefonía celular y puso a sus 3.4 millones de ciudadanos en una crisis humanitaria crítica.

 

Se cortó la electricidad en el 100% de la isla y la mayoría de la gente tenía acceso limitado a agua potable y alimentos [7].

 

El huracán María fue responsable de la pérdida de 5000 vidas en Puerto Rico según Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. La principal causa de mortalidad fue la falta de atención médica, en gran parte causada por el continuo cierre de servicios básicos. En promedio, los hogares estuvieron sin electricidad durante 84 días y sin agua durante 68 días. También les costó a las empresas hasta $90 mil millones de dólares estadounidenses.

 

Los cortes de energía que duran todo el día siguen siendo comunes, particularmente en las áreas rurales. Los árboles derrumbados y los postes de servicios públicos son ahora algo común. Cientos de miles de puertorriqueños han abandonado la isla debido a las dificultades actuales [6].

  • 134 vidas perdidas [8]
  • La cuarta tormenta atlántica en EE. UU. Más costosa con 77.1 millones de dólares [9]

Cuando terminó el huracán Irma, el 80% del condado de Miami-Dade seguía sin electricidad [9],, y el 25% de todas las cuentas del condado seguían sin electricidad una semana después. Debido a el respaldo inadecuado de generadores, una docena de vidas se perdieron trágicamente en un hogar local para personas de la tercera edad.

 

Días antes de que la tormenta tocara tierra, más del 60% de las estaciones de servicio en el área de Miami / Fort Lauderdale se quedaron sin combustible [10], y se necesitaron semanas para recargar los suministros de combustible. Como resultado, se perdieron 134 vidas.

  • La falla de energía más grande en la historia de América del Norte, abarcando 24,086 kilómetros cuadrados y afectando a aproximadamente 50 millones de personas.
  • Al menos 11 vidas perdidas [11]

Más de 50 millones de personas en el noreste de los Estados Unidos y Ontario Canadá experimentaron el mayor corte de energía en la historia de América del Norte (14 de agosto de 2003). Los trabajos de restauración continuaron durante nueve días hasta que terminó el estado de emergencia (22 de agosto).

 

Se estimó que los trabajadores de Ontario perdieron 18.9 millones de horas de empleo y los envíos de manufactura cayeron $2.3 mil millones. El apagón derivó en al menos 11 muertos y un costo estimado de $6 mil millones.

  • 200 a 700 vidas perdidas [2]
  • $195 mil millones en pérdidas económicas directas e indirectas. El desastre más costoso en la historia de Texas [3] [4]

Según un nuevo análisis de la Universidad de Houston, la mayoría de los tejanos que reciben servicios del sistema eléctrico principal del estado se vieron afectados por la terrible y mortal tormenta invernal, con casi el 70% de los afectados perdiendo energía en condiciones de congelación y casi la mitad sufriendo cortes de agua.

 

Los que se quedaron sin electricidad pasaron en promedio 42 horas sin luz [5].

 

La gravedad de los daños causados ​​por la tormenta podría convertirlo en el desastre más costoso en la historia de Texas, resultando en la lamentable pérdida de unas 200 a 700 vidas.

  • Casi 5.000 vidas perdidas
  • 90.1 millones de dólares en costos para las empresas [6]

El huracán María arrasó la isla de Puerto Rico, destruyó árboles, derribó estaciones meteorológicas, torres de telefonía celular y puso a sus 3.4 millones de ciudadanos en una crisis humanitaria crítica.

 

Se cortó la electricidad en el 100% de la isla y la mayoría de la gente tenía acceso limitado a agua potable y alimentos [7].

 

El huracán María fue responsable de la pérdida de 5000 vidas en Puerto Rico según Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. La principal causa de mortalidad fue la falta de atención médica, en gran parte causada por el continuo cierre de servicios básicos. En promedio, los hogares estuvieron sin electricidad durante 84 días y sin agua durante 68 días. También les costó a las empresas hasta $90 mil millones de dólares estadounidenses.

 

Los cortes de energía que duran todo el día siguen siendo comunes, particularmente en las áreas rurales. Los árboles derrumbados y los postes de servicios públicos son ahora algo común. Cientos de miles de puertorriqueños han abandonado la isla debido a las dificultades actuales [6].

  • 134 vidas perdidas [8]
  • La cuarta tormenta atlántica en EE. UU. Más costosa con 77.1 millones de dólares [9]

Cuando terminó el huracán Irma, el 80% del condado de Miami-Dade seguía sin electricidad [9],, y el 25% de todas las cuentas del condado seguían sin electricidad una semana después. Debido a el respaldo inadecuado de generadores, una docena de vidas se perdieron trágicamente en un hogar local para personas de la tercera edad.

 

Días antes de que la tormenta tocara tierra, más del 60% de las estaciones de servicio en el área de Miami / Fort Lauderdale se quedaron sin combustible [10], y se necesitaron semanas para recargar los suministros de combustible. Como resultado, se perdieron 134 vidas.

  • La falla de energía más grande en la historia de América del Norte, abarcando 24,086 kilómetros cuadrados y afectando a aproximadamente 50 millones de personas.
  • Al menos 11 vidas perdidas [11]

Más de 50 millones de personas en el noreste de los Estados Unidos y Ontario Canadá experimentaron el mayor corte de energía en la historia de América del Norte (14 de agosto de 2003). Los trabajos de restauración continuaron durante nueve días hasta que terminó el estado de emergencia (22 de agosto).

 

Se estimó que los trabajadores de Ontario perdieron 18.9 millones de horas de empleo y los envíos de manufactura cayeron $2.3 mil millones. El apagón derivó en al menos 11 muertos y un costo estimado de $6 mil millones.

En Canadá, los cambios climáticos extremos y rápidos causan hasta el 32% de los incidentes de cortes de energía, que son difíciles de predecir y generalmente no dan tiempo para crear un plan de emergencia.

Según Dunn & Bradstreet, el 59 por ciento de las empresas de Fortune 500 tienen un tiempo de inactividad semanal de al menos 1.6 horas. Si una compañía Fortune 500 emplea a 10,000 personas y les paga un promedio de $56 por hora (incluidas prestaciones), el costo del tiempo de inactividad solo en la mano de obra sería de $896,000 por semana o más de $46 millones por año [1].

Los costos tangibles e intangibles durante una interrupción para estas empresas incluyen: [1]

Referencias:

  1. “Blackout Tracker Canada,” Eaton Power Quality Company, February 2014
  2. “Heights lifts boil-water notice after 8 days,” The Killeen Daily Herald, February 27, 2021
  3. “Winter Storm URI After-Action Review Findings Report,” City of Austin & Travis County, 2021
  4. Garrett Golding, Anil Kumar and Karel Mertens, “Cost of Texas’ 2021 Deep Freeze Justifies Weatherization,” Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, April 15, 2021
  5. Neelam Bohra, “Almost 70% of ERCOT customers lost power during winter storm, study finds,” The Texas Tribune, March 29, 2021
  6. D. D. Kane, “Mortality in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria,” N. Engl. J. Med., vol. 379, no. 17, p. e30, 2018
  7. “The facts: Hurricane Maria’s effect on Puerto Rico,” Mercy Corps, January 19, 2018, Updated September 09, 2020
  8. Amy Gesenhues, “Hurricane Irma was the No. 1 top trending Google search in the US & globally for 2017,” Search Engine Land, December 13, 2017
  9. A. Dodson, “This Florida City Used ‘Smart Data’ To Stay Ahead Of Hurricane Michael.,” 2018
  10. M. Egan, “Gas shortage: Florida races to refill gas stations after Hurricane Irma,” CNN Business, 2017
  11. “Ontario–U.S. Power Outage—Impacts on Critical Infrastructure Number: IA06-002,” Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, August, 2006

ACERCA DE NOSOTROS

EVolve Grid está impulsado proporcionar los sistemas de administración de energía V2G bidireccionales y las tecnologías de microredes de DC más innovadores y eficientes a industrias e infraestructuras críticas de todo el mundo, para satisfacer las necesidades de mitigación de desastres, resiliencia climática y sustentabilidad energética para un futuro más verde y brillante libre de emisiones.